Sign up Latest Topics Chat
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Buffalo McKinley

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 222
Reply with quote  #1 
Hello,

If you're using gimmicked cards or I guess anything that has a gimmick, what do you say/do when a spectator says something like "Let me see that"?

Thanks,

Buffalo
0
Magic Harry

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 349
Reply with quote  #2 
I always liked “I’ll show you mine if you show me
yours”
Magic Harry

__________________
Harry Damareck
0
chris w

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 588
Reply with quote  #3 
Ideally, a trick is structured in a way that there's enough forward momentum in the presentation to slyly get any gimmicks out of play by the time someone thinks to say "Let me see that."

Barring that, I'd go with "No."
0
Magic Harry

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 349
Reply with quote  #4 
"No" was my second choice if humor didn't dissuade them.
Magic Harry

__________________
Harry Damareck
0
Mind Phantom

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,388
Reply with quote  #5 
I once had a guy grab my ESP cards and one was a double card and he looked thru all 10 cards and he couldn't spot the double card,

Lucky for me.

MP-

__________________
Self Concept Is Destiny...
0
lopabrc

Member
Registered:
Posts: 24
Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris w
Ideally, a trick is structured in a way that there's enough forward momentum in the presentation to slyly get any gimmicks out of play by the time someone thinks to say "Let me see that."


I agree.  Also you might consider how that particular trick fits on your routine.  If you allow the spectator to hold/examine  a regular pack of  cards on previous tricks, and later on, you secretly introduce a gimmick it is less likely they tell you "let me see that", because you already established  certain level of trust.
0
arthur stead

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 998
Reply with quote  #7 

Pre-determined sequencing and transitions are also a good way to distract nosy or suspicious people.  Structure your act in such a way that you’re into the next trick before they have a chance to ask questions.


__________________
http://www.arthurstead.com
0
luigimar

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member - Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 1,566
Reply with quote  #8 
I was presenting Paul Harris' Solid Deception and my spectator wanted to see the deck before the end. So I told him to wait and I would let him examine it. So I finished the effect and handed him the deck and when he saw the deck was solid, this shocked him even more... This spectator was my father and he didn't like magic much but when I performed something for him, he was always suspicious and this time, being suspicious worked against him and in my favor...
__________________
Luigimar
Magic is Within...
0
Magic Harry

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 349
Reply with quote  #9 
Mind Phantom's experience reminds me of the time, had to be in the '70s, when I was doing cig through handkerchief with a metal thumbtip and the guy grabbed my hand! Unbelievably he didn't see the tip I guess because he wasn't looking for it. He just looked at my palm and then turned my hand over and let go.
I think we're engaged? [biggrin]
Magic Harry

__________________
Harry Damareck
0
Michaelblue

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,234
Reply with quote  #10 
If someone asked me that, i would say, "sure."  And then put the cards in my pocket before they can see them. They get the hint that something might be funky but they wont know what. And its polite.
0
James Nelson

Member
Registered:
Posts: 20
Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by arthur stead

Pre-determined sequencing and transitions are also a good way to distract nosy or suspicious people.  Structure your act in such a way that you’re into the next trick before they have a chance to ask questions.



I have never been a fan of any routine where the magician forces you to examine the props at the end of a trick because they are clean. To me it looks strange. Insist they be examined then later deny examination if you are dirty? 

I agree with moving into the next phase of a routine with a flow to not provide the opportunity to be challenged.
0
snmagic

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 61
Reply with quote  #12 
I've came across that problem a few time and found myself using the switch-a-roo to help with the issue. As they ask me to see the cards at the same time I'm placing the card in the device and switching out the cards for regular ones. Have yet to caught on what I'm doing. I know its a hard item to find at the moment but if you can get your hands on one well worth it if your using a sports jackets, suit, or anything shirt with a pocket in it. 
0
Intensely Magic

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 552
Reply with quote  #13 
I have long felt that there's a nearly palpable stench if there is still dirt out at the conclusion of a routine. If things are clean, generally the spectators "feel" that and there is no need for examination.

Switcheroo is a wonderful piece of apparatus from Mark Mason, I believe. I believe Michael Close said he used it once in a while to clean up after his wonderful Pothole Trick. Incidentally, that is a master's class in manage of spectators and props. I highly recommend it.

__________________
A Crappy Trick with a great presentation is still a Crappy Trick.

0
Mike Powers

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,402
Reply with quote  #14 
Just for the record Switcheroo is the brainchild of Russ Niedzwiecki. Very clever item too.

Mike
0
EVILDAN

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,820
Reply with quote  #15 
I structure my magic so nothing is given out for inspection. I think it sets a bad precedent. When people ask if they can examine something even a deck of cards, I tell them no.

I explain that I used to let people examine items in the past but they took it to mean they can destroy the item in the process. I had one person rip up cards and another person slam a cup on the ground - so now nobody gets to examine anything.
0
Paco Nagata

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 323
Reply with quote  #16 
In a trick that uses gimmicks I always try to build the routine so that I can get rid of them to finish clear.

Actually I hate tricks in which it is not possible to get rid of the gimmicks.

Nevertheless, in those situation I usually reply:

"Magical stuff are very dangerous; they can hurt people that are not magicians."

You may not believe it, but it has worked for me as my people lost interest in examine my magical stuff (^_^)

I have even resorted to saying (fictitious) scaring stories like:

"One day I gave a magical card as a souvenir to a spectator. Three days later he phoned me telling me that after trying to do magic with that card in his house, weird things were happening. Doors opened and closed by themselves and I saw images of people in the corridors. Then I went to his house and I disenchanted the card. Since then, those strange things stop happening in his house."

Once I mentioned something similar to some spectators and they took away the desire to ask for the cards or even touch them (!)

In short, scare them.

In other ocassions I've told to some curious spectators that "magical cards" may cause in no-magician's hands an electric shock! Then I offer the cards and they don't dare to touch them ^_^
If the do, I make an electric noise as he or she try to take it, and I say: "Dear me! Sometimes I feel too the electric shock! It would be better keep it out!"

So that I create a comical environment along with some excuses about why not to hand the cards.

In addition, when I give away something as a souvenir like a card or a deck that has participated in a trick (and have no secrets), I say that I have "disenchanted" it, so that it doesn’t do any strange things at home "for safety.”
That will bring and excuse for the reason why you don’t give some other objects on other occasions (not all objects are "disenchantable").
So, you can divert the attention of your usual viewers during your successive shows with comments like that, building some general excuses for your habitual behaviour.

__________________
"The Passion of an Amateur Card Magician" https://bit.ly/2lXdO2O
"La pasion de un cartómago aficionado" https://bit.ly/2kkjpjn
Latest erratum corrections and improvements update, 16/06/2020
0
JoshP06

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 101
Reply with quote  #17 
Not to be mean, but if someone asks to see the deck, coins, etc. you obviously didn't perform it that well.

Once someone suspects something, anything that could have been magical just turns into a puzzle. And then you look like a fool.

Work on your structuring of your tricks, and your presentation. That's what it boils down to.

So get to work...[smile][smile]

Best wishes,

Josh
0
EndersGame

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 353
Reply with quote  #18 
Yes, controlling your routines and your audience is pretty important here.  

There's much more that needs to be considered besides just a simple answer to a request to see your props.

__________________
BoardGameGeek reviewer EndersGame  Playing Card Reviews  Magic Reviews  Board Game Reviews 

[nTzBCzo]

0
Paco Nagata

Avatar / Picture

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 323
Reply with quote  #19 
I think that here we are mixing two different things:

1- Spectators ask for examining your props because does not believe in magic. So, no matter how well you perform your show or how clear it is, if a spectator does not believe in magic he or she may want you to hand your stuff to be examined. So, a witty and funny answer would be necessary if couldn't be able to get rid of the gimmick during the routine.

2- The other thing is working hard on structuring your magic show so that everything could be examined, just because you have developed a way to ge rid of any gimmick during the show itself.

Actually, being able to get rid of the gimmicks drives you to a new great magical effect or impact:

Proving that there are no trick!

A concept that I call personally "resolution of a magic trick"
So, if you can get rid of the gimmicks you can enhance the magical impact if they ask you to examine your things.

Anyway it does not usually happen if you are a magician with a certain reputation.

__________________
"The Passion of an Amateur Card Magician" https://bit.ly/2lXdO2O
"La pasion de un cartómago aficionado" https://bit.ly/2kkjpjn
Latest erratum corrections and improvements update, 16/06/2020
0
EVILDAN

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,820
Reply with quote  #20 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoshP06
Not to be mean, but if someone asks to see the deck, coins, etc. you obviously didn't perform it that well.
Josh


While I generally agree with that, there are exceptions - like not getting a chance to perform at all. 

In a festival setting I have teens come up to me with a chip on their shoulder. 
These are usually the alpha males or worse, the alpha females - the kind that come over, loudly chewing gum, and start off with "What ya got?" And then they look off in the distance because they're not really interested anyway. 
Then you take out a deck of cards and the first thing they say is, "Can I examine the deck?" 

So, back to your statement, when you haven't even started and they are just looking to be cool to their friends that they are ruining the magician - then no, it's not you. It's just the person. 

I fondly remember one teenage girl at a festival that was a real pain as described above. I switched things up and performed B'wave for her, then had her look at a card, shuffle it back in the deck and revealed it by reading her mind. She looked at me and asked "How do you do that?" 

I then asked her, in a low voice, if she would like me to reveal what she really thinks of her friends - motioning over to her small band of followers. She raised her hands up in the air and shouted, "That's it, we're outta here." 

And just for the record - I rarely have people, except the type noted above, ask to examine anything. 





0
JoshP06

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 101
Reply with quote  #21 
I agree. There will always be those select few who can't even tolerate magic.

Still think it's possible to manage those kinds of people and wow them regardless.

Josh
0
TheAmazingStanley

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 146
Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by EVILDAN


While I generally agree with that, there are exceptions - like not getting a chance to perform at all. 

In a festival setting I have teens come up to me with a chip on their shoulder. 
These are usually the alpha males or worse, the alpha females - the kind that come over, loudly chewing gum, and start off with "What ya got?" And then they look off in the distance because they're not really interested anyway. 
Then you take out a deck of cards and the first thing they say is, "Can I examine the deck?" 

So, back to your statement, when you haven't even started and they are just looking to be cool to their friends that they are ruining the magician - then no, it's not you. It's just the person. 

I fondly remember one teenage girl at a festival that was a real pain as described above. I switched things up and performed B'wave for her, then had her look at a card, shuffle it back in the deck and revealed it by reading her mind. She looked at me and asked "How do you do that?" 

I then asked her, in a low voice, if she would like me to reveal what she really thinks of her friends - motioning over to her small band of followers. She raised her hands up in the air and shouted, "That's it, we're outta here." 

And just for the record - I rarely have people, except the type noted above, ask to examine anything. 







Wow talk about audience management! This one is filed away under “for future reference.”

__________________
When you come to a fork in the road, take it!
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.