Sign up Latest Topics Chat
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Jack Bear

Inner Circle
Registered:
Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #1 

.

0
Anthony Vinson

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member - Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 2,167
Reply with quote  #2 
Jack,

Welcome to TMF, and thanks for sharing your write up. Reminiscent of an old lateral thinking puzzle about two robots, one who always lies and the other who always tell the truth.

Since you enjoy mentalism with cards, who are some of your favorite creators? Have you studied any of Ben Blau's work?

Av
0
Robin Dawes

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,241
Reply with quote  #3 
If you are a fan of Liar/Truthteller puzzles (as I am) I recommend the many books of Raymond Smullyan, philosopher, logician and magician.

My favourite routine along these lines is from Jack Yates.  It involves 6 audience volunteers, one of whom is secretly holding your wallet.  Three of the volunteers are liars and three are truthful but of course you don't know who.  As the detective, you ask each of the suspects two questions.  You then eliminate the suspects one by one until only the thief is left.  What I like about this routine - aside from the high stakes for you and the comedic interplay as you question the suspects - is that the questions you ask are REALLY simple - the volunteers never have to try to figure out hypothetical questions about how others might answer.  Because with these routines, if the volunteer screws up and gives the wong answer, you are sunk.
0
Mike Powers

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,716
Reply with quote  #4 
Hi Robin,

Where is the Jack Yates routine? It sounds very cool.

Mike
0
Robin Dawes

Avatar / Picture

Honored Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,241
Reply with quote  #5 
I learned the routine I mentioned from Karl Fulves' "Self-Working Close-Up Card Magic".   It is routine 12 in the book, titled "Pack of Lies".   As is often the case with Fulves it is not transparent how much of any routine is his and how much comes from his sources.  Regarding this one, he says "It is based on ideas of Keith Downs and Jack Yates."  I spent some time trying to find the original.

I was not able to find any information regarding Keith Downs (see edit below), but Jack Yates published quite a lot.  I discovered that one of his books was titled "Clue and Other Mysteries" which seemed like a good possibility so I tracked down a second-hand copy.  The "Clue" routine is very similar in plot to the one in the Fulves book but the method is much more convoluted - it involved a change bag and a stacked packet of cards.  However the core technique for determining the villain is related. 

Of the two versions, Fulves' is much better ... but I think Yates should get credit for originating the plot and key elements of the method.

Fulves' title "Pack of Lies" draws on his use of playing cards to determine who lies and who tells the truth, and the use of the Ace of Diamonds as the treasure held by the thief.  I guess that qualified the routine for inclusion in a book of card magic.  I think it is much better to use coloured stones to determine the roles and to give the thief something of real (or apparent) value to hide.

Neither Fulves nor Yates has much to say about presentation - they seem to prefer jumping straight to naming the villain as soon as you have the information.  I think it is much better theatre to eliminate the suspects one by one.


_________________________

Edit:  There is a British magician named Keith Downs who specializes in children's magic parties.  He may or may not be the person Fulves is referring to.
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.